(T)ERROR

 

 
 
(T)ERROR_poster.jpg
 

Sundance Institute | Candescent Award


(T)error was a Candescent Award winner at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. The Candescent Award was created by Lilly Hartley in partnership with the Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program (DFP) and is awarded to powerful social issue films that have been supported during production by the DFP and that premiere at the Sundance Film Festival. Candescent is a supporter of the Sundance Institute and believes in the exceptional mentors, filmmakers and leaders that create a sense of community through the Sundance Institute DFP.

 

(T)error marks the first time that filmmakers have had access to an active counterterrorism sting, documenting the action as it unfolds on the ground. Viewers get an unfettered glimpse of the government's counterterrorism tactics and the murky justifications behind them through the perspective of *******, a 63-year-old Black revolutionary turned FBI informant.

Taut, stark, and controversial, (T)error illuminates the fragile relationships between individuals and the surveillance state in modern America.
—Sundance

 

PRESS

 

 
 

 
 

Lyric R. Cabral is a photojournalist and emerging documentary filmmaker. Her most recent photo reportage, USA VS. we the people, explores the lives of Muslim-American families impacted by terrorism convictions. Photographs from this project have been published in The Nation, The Village Voice, The Huffington Post, and Colorlines. Her recent photography clients include ITVS, National Geographic UK, Tribeca Film Institute, and Democracy Now. Cabral’s photography is held in collection at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery, the Studio Museum of Harlem, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among others. In 2007, American Photo Magazine identified Cabral as one of 15 international photographers to watch. Also named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film” in 2013, (T)error is her first feature-length documentary.

 

David FeliX Sutcliffe, Director/Producer

 

 
 

David Felix Sutcliffe is a media educator and documentary filmmaker. In 2013, Filmmaker Magazine named him as one of the “25 New Faces of Independent Film.” His first film, ADAMA, funded by ITVS and broadcast on PBS World in 2011, featured the story of a 16-year-old Muslim girl growing up in Harlem who was arrested by the FBI on suspicion of being a “potential suicide bomber.” He has received artist grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the US State Department, and the Independent Television Service. He has also been honored with a National Scholastic Art and Writing award for his work as a media educator, and has been a cinematographer on films in Paris, Indonesia, Kenya, and Kansas. His work has been broadcast on PBS, BET, and Al-Jazeera.

 

Christopher St. John, Producer

 

 
 

Christopher St. John is a producer and journalist with broad experience in print, broadcast, and documentary film. He is currently working on Denial, a film about electricity and family, and recently completed (T)error. In 2012, he produced The House I Live In, about America’s war on drugs, which won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize for documentary. He also co-produced HBO’s Reagan, which won an Emmy for outstanding historical programming, and Freakonomics, based upon the best-selling book. Christopher began his career in production at ABC News, working for Good Morning America before moving to the News Magazine division, where he contributed extensively to 20/20 and Primetime. In an earlier life, he worked as a reporter in Southeast Asia for a number of international publications.

 

Eugene Jarecki, Executive Producer

 

 
 

Eugene Jarecki is an award-winning dramatic and documentary filmmaker whose most recent film The House I Live In (2012) won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. His earlier film Why We Fight (2005) also won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival and the 2006 Peabody Award. Jarecki’s 2001 film, The Trials of Henry Kissinger, was broadcast in 30 countries and nominated for an Independent Spirit Award.